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    Avatar Of Br0Warrenbr0warren
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    Post count: 6

    I picked up my #16 hollow last week to dress up the bit (unboxing the shop after being in storage for several years) and noticed the iron is skewed (@12d). It’s labeled a Cox & Luckman and the body is straight (Did not warp at the mouth). The iron and wedge at least match the body in fit and patina if not the originals.

    Is this an anomaly or were some hollows made with skewed throats and irons and does it matter in use? I would assume the cut would yield the same result, but maybe a bit easier on end grain.

    If this is an unusual plane, I want to park it with the collectables rather than put it into service.  at this point, it may have been turped, but does not appear to be modified.

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    • Avatar Of Mike In TnMike in TN
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      Post count: 301

      I just re-watched a Woodwright’s shop episode off of YouTube (Raising Panel Zona) where Roy used a skewed hollow plane and he stated that it was skewed to help in doing cross grained work s you stated. That doesn’t answer the question on how rare they are though.

      Have fun

      • Avatar Of Mike In TnMike in TN
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        Post count: 301

        In case you are interested, The Woodwright’s Shop episodes for 2015-2016 includes a program with Roy and Bill Anderson which deals with hollows and rounds and mentions skewed planes in the process.

        Have fun

    • Avatar Of Br0Warrenbr0warren
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      Post count: 6

      Ok, so its not an accident…. I’ve watched that episode several times and missed that point. Thanks for the reminder about that episode.

      Now its the rarity issue…. I have to decide if it should be preserved or its OK to put it to work.

      Thanks again…..

    • Avatar Of Br0Warrenbr0warren
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      Post count: 6

      My PBS station has not reliably played the 2015 season of the WRS, so I’ve not seen that episode(s) yet. I usually have to wait until the DVD comes out, but I will look for it.

      The plane does cut nice though. I think the angle does help a bit.

    • Avatar Of Mike In TnMike in TN
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      Post count: 301

      Hi again,

      You can watch them online.

      http://www.pbs.org/woodwrightsshop/home/

      Have fun

    • Avatar Of Br0Warrenbr0warren
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      Post count: 6

      I’ll head right over….thanks!!

    • Avatar Of TyteTyte
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      Post count: 1

      Cox and Luckman – skew mouth plane

      Hi, to answer your query:

      1. your hollow moulding plane has a skew mouth to help prevent tearout when encountering cross grain.

      2. Cox and Luckman started as Planemakers from 1839 until  about 1876 at Union Works, Darwin Street, Birmingham, England. From then onwards, they occupied premises at Stanhope Street and ultimately Gooch Street, both in Birmingham. They were very prolific makers of all types of carpenters, joiners and coachmakers planes. sometimes they also marked the planes with London to try and add saleability to their products, in a competative market.

      So, the answer to your second query is that theyier planes are not particularly rare. Use it rather than put it on a shelf to look at!

      Hope that all helps,

      Tyte

    • Avatar Of Br0Warrenbr0warren
      Participant
      Post count: 6

      Future plans

      Thanks for the reply and I will put it to work. If it were deliberate, I knew why and have made a couple of skewed rabbits for the same reason.

      If this works as advertised, I may try to make some of these also, and maybe a matching round.

    • Avatar Of Historic DesignHistoric Design
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      Post count: 4

      Skewed hollows and rounds

      British plane makers regularly made hollows and rounds with skewed irons. Some American manufactures did also (for instance Ohio Tool Company made sets numbered 72 1/2 and 73 1/2) but they are fairly rare.  Most American joiners and cabinet makers did not use the skewed irons.  My set of user hollows and rounds was made by the English plane maker Varvill and Sons. and are skewed.

      One quick way to tell English planes is the bedding angle of the iron is usually steeper, most being a York pitch or about 50 degrees.

      Cheers.

       

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